Bolton and Bury

bocadillo

Water Gypsy

Shit times for Bolton.

(Yes I know they’re not in the Championship).
Bury are not in the Championship either, I know. But it's impossible to ignore the comparison between the fortunes of the two big clubs in Manchester and the precarious position of their two neighbours.

 

pork pie fox

Well-Known Member
Bury are not in the Championship either, I know. But it's impossible to ignore the comparison between the fortunes of the two big clubs in Manchester and the precarious position of their two neighbours.

Yes I’ve been following that story too. I heard their owner talking about their plight the other day and he seemed to feel that the EFL weren’t being helpful to their efforts.
 

tedfoxxx

Well-Known Member
So how has Bassini managed to get a court to agree to block the sale?

He seems like a ****ing nutter of the highest order.
 

Robin127

Well-Known Member
The bloke has a history of business failures and broken promises, he's not particularly popular at Waford either.
 

Brown Nose

Well-Known Member
It's remarkable to me how long many smaller clubs have survived. There will surely be far fewer professional teams in another twenty years.

Both Bury and Bolton are about as far from Manchester as Loughborough or Hinckley are from Leicester. The massive gravitational pull of the two Manchester sides will inevitably kill some of the clubs in their vicinity.

Yes, both sides have been managed very poorly. But the real issue is a bigger one. Kids won't support those sides when they could support a Manchester one. Their path to oblivion is set already.

Leicester are very fortunate in having a tremendous geographical dominance. When we were hopelessly mismanaged and in a state, we had the potential to rebuild. Why would anyone save these sides when their decline is already inevitable?
 

RHYDAL

Well-Known Member
It's remarkable to me how long many smaller clubs have survived. There will surely be far fewer professional teams in another twenty years.

Both Bury and Bolton are about as far from Manchester as Loughborough or Hinckley are from Leicester. The massive gravitational pull of the two Manchester sides will inevitably kill some of the clubs in their vicinity.

Yes, both sides have been managed very poorly. But the real issue is a bigger one. Kids won't support those sides when they could support a Manchester one. Their path to oblivion is set already.

Leicester are very fortunate in having a tremendous geographical dominance. When we were hopelessly mismanaged and in a state, we had the potential to rebuild. Why would anyone save these sides when their decline is already inevitable?
So, to summarise, DOOMED.
 

jb5000

Well-Known Member
Loughborough had a league club which went under iirc in the twenties, I don't think Hinckley ever got that far but they were a very decent non-league side for a long time - meanwhile in the northwest there is a culture of having far more locally suppported clubs in towns that aren't very big - Blackburn and Burnley are considerable smaller than Leicester, there's all the clubs orbiting around Manchester (of which Bolton and Bury are only two), and Accrington is absolutely tiny. But these clubs flourished when Loughborough and Hinckley did not, so there must be something that gives them a hope of survival now.
 

Ike O'Noclassed

Well-Known Member
Loughborough had a league club which went under iirc in the twenties, I don't think Hinckley ever got that far but they were a very decent non-league side for a long time - meanwhile in the northwest there is a culture of having far more locally suppported clubs in towns that aren't very big - Blackburn and Burnley are considerable smaller than Leicester, there's all the clubs orbiting around Manchester (of which Bolton and Bury are only two), and Accrington is absolutely tiny. But these clubs flourished when Loughborough and Hinckley did not, so there must be something that gives them a hope of survival now.
Bolton and Bury are firmly within the cradle of the Northern and Midland heartlands of professional association football. Despite the transformation of the game into a world wide commodity, traditions persist, as the predominance of NE, scouse and Manc accents in Prem dressing rooms (not least our own immortals) testifies. We’re geographically barely on the edge of this, our success and eminent players is something to be very proud of, in an area where the egg chasers are so strong.

I think the old Football League and the wider society gave the English game a hundred years of stability, now partially broken down, so the future will be more like the instability in the Italian and Spanish leagues with old city clubs (like Fiorentina) going tits up and then reforming. Let’s face it when Brexit ****wittery really hits its stride, the whole country will resemble 1970s Italy, why should footballl be immune?

One interesting back to the future thing is the piling up of rich man’s hobby clubs atNational and League 1/2 level. Fleetwood, Salford, Forest Green, AFC Fylde and the like may well thrive as long as they are bankrolled, then go the way of Rushden and Diamonds, Glossop North End and Loughborough Town pdq once the tap is turned off. Meanwhile the “old” clubs like Notts and Chesterfield will find it fearfully difficult to climb back up the ladder, and for Bury and Bolton they may sink fast and rise very slowly too.
 
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Premier League

P Pld Pts
Liverpool 33  89
Manchester City 33  66
Chelsea 34  60
Leicester 34  59
Manchester Utd 33  55
Wolves 33  52
Arsenal 34  50
Tottenham  33  48
Sheffield Utd 33  48
10 Burnley 33  46
11 Everton 33  44
12 Newcastle Utd 33  43
13 Southampton 33  43
14 Palace 34  42
15 Brighton 33  36
16 West Ham Utd 33  31
17 Watford 34  31
18 Aston Villa 33  27
19 Bournemouth 33  27
20 Norwich City 34  21
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