Premier League suspended until April (or whenever?)

popillius

Well-Known Member
If you think that money is coming out of the owners and agents pockets you are severely mistaken. Surely those living in England know how the rich and powerful apply austerity measures?
The money will have to come from somewhere and everyone will take a hit. Okay, some more than others but I don't really care. At the top level, clubs won't go bust, they will just have to be far more sensible with how they spend their money, especially in the transfer market which is, at present, over inflated beyond what anyone could have imagined. If money is short, agents will no longer have the power they have in pushing transfer fees past the ridiculous so they can cream off their unearned millions and clubs will have to think more about how they keep fans coming to cup games or televised games rather than accepting half full stadiums because they know they are taking cash in from everywhere else.

The very notion of talking about games behind closed doors shows exactly how far the notion of a 'club' has disappeared from the game. Fans aren't even in the top 20 things the FA or The Premier League care about. They come somewhere below advertisers, SkySports, shirt sales, foreign TV, hospitality 'guests' etc.....

As for this ludicrous argument about footballers being safer that most other people who have gone back to work (Not your line of debate MA but I'm too lazy to post twice!), well, that's impossible to determine. Talking about the fact they will have been tested is meaningless as people can well be carrying the virus before it shows up on a test and therefore, be capable of transmitting it. Add to that the inevitable bodily contact, the saliva, coughing, sneezing, blowing noses, medical staff having to get close to injured players etc... I for one wouldn't want to put myself in that place if I was a footballer or a member of staff with a family to think of, regardless of what an armchair scientist or two deemed to be safe.
 

Miles Away

Well-Known Member
The money will have to come from somewhere and everyone will take a hit.
Fair enough Pop. I suppose I’m a little closer to it than some. The league I happen to work for has already had two rounds of layoffs (around 200 people) and has slashed 20% off all salaries at all levels of employment. The owner and family are worth around 3 Billion. Suspect they will be fine.

I don’t say this as self-pitying and I’m probably over-sharing but I hope it illustrates my larger point. Which is that the billionaires will eat the poor first.

I’d expect more of the same from the majority of owners around sports. The pain of the delay is most acutely felt far down the org charts. Which is grimly depressing, of course.
 

popillius

Well-Known Member
Fair enough Pop. I suppose I’m a little closer to it than some. The league I happen to work for has already had two rounds of layoffs (around 200 people) and has slashed 20% off all salaries at all levels of employment. The owner and family are worth around 3 Billion. Suspect they will be fine.

I don’t say this as self-pitying and I’m probably over-sharing but I hope it illustrates my larger point. Which is that the billionaires will eat the poor first.

I’d expect more of the same from the majority of owners around sports. The pain of the delay is most acutely felt far down the org charts. Which is grimly depressing, of course.
Actually, you are totally right. I guess I just hate the control and change that money has brought to the top leagues of football and perhaps I'm guilty of forgetting that there is a massive structure that sits behind that. On the one hand I would actually love to see capital reduced for clubs and football to go back to what it once was; the working man's affordable escape after a week of graft but on the other, the change has been so vast that for that to happen, what you allude to in terms of shafting those at the bottom of the pyramids first, would also have to happen and that's just crass.
 

Skitzo

Well-Known Member
Pop I agree I would love to see football overhauled to make it more financially fair but that horse has well and truly bolted, only hope of it happening is when the tv money bubble bursts and they are forced to but tv companies buy it as a loss leader and next tv deal I suspect people like Amazon to bid big for streaming rights so I can’t see it happening soon, these turkeys will not be voting for Christmas
 

Robin127

Well-Known Member
Fair enough Pop. I suppose I’m a little closer to it than some. The league I happen to work for has already had two rounds of layoffs (around 200 people) and has slashed 20% off all salaries at all levels of employment. The owner and family are worth around 3 Billion. Suspect they will be fine.

I don’t say this as self-pitying and I’m probably over-sharing but I hope it illustrates my larger point. Which is that the billionaires will eat the poor first.

I’d expect more of the same from the majority of owners around sports. The pain of the delay is most acutely felt far down the org charts. Which is grimly depressing, of course.
The France family?
 

Blue Maniac

Alzheimers sufferer
In any business, the responsible thing to do is to prepare for the worst. Now, it’s impossible to predict the details of every possible scenario, and I doubt many people seriously predicted 2020 being anything like the situation we find ourselves living in now. However, when your organisation’s entire revenue depends on one core activity, you have to prepare for the worst: that your product becomes impossible to produce and the source of your income dries up entirely.

The chaos and uncertainty in recent weeks has made it clear that the Premier League had no such plan. In a global organisation worth billions, in almost three decades, not one person in a position of influence had thought to put in place any kind of framework to guide officials in the event a season could not be completed in the usual time for any reason. They clearly aren’t the only ones. The EFL, the FA, FIFA, UEFA, nobody had any established policies in place. They’re just winging it.

To everyone I ask: what the ****?
 

FOX Franks

Well-Known Member
Fair enough Pop. I suppose I’m a little closer to it than some. The league I happen to work for has already had two rounds of layoffs (around 200 people) and has slashed 20% off all salaries at all levels of employment. The owner and family are worth around 3 Billion. Suspect they will be fine.

I don’t say this as self-pitying and I’m probably over-sharing but I hope it illustrates my larger point. Which is that the billionaires will eat the poor first.

I’d expect more of the same from the majority of owners around sports. The pain of the delay is most acutely felt far down the org charts. Which is grimly depressing, of course.
Absolutely, the people running these organisations will take it as opportunity to weep to governments complaining their income is affected, and cut the wages of everyone working for them with a fantastic ready-made excuse that unions can't argue with.

Yet another instance in which the rich literally can only get richer. They're protected from any kind of financial shocks and successive governments have got themselves so tied up trying to avoid raising income tax with hidden shit that no-one seems to be able to do anything about it (not that Boris would, anyway)
 

Miles Away

Well-Known Member
Absolutely, the people running these organisations will take it as opportunity to weep to governments complaining their income is affected, and cut the wages of everyone working for them with a fantastic ready-made excuse that unions can't argue with.

Yet another instance in which the rich literally can only get richer. They're protected from any kind of financial shocks and successive governments have got themselves so tied up trying to avoid raising income tax with hidden shit that no-one seems to be able to do anything about it (not that Boris would, anyway)
the wealth divide coming out of this will be unprecedented in the history of humanity. Will make the Roman Empire look socialist by comparison.

grim.
 

Brown Nose

Well-Known Member
Am I being dim, or does this answer mean that the whole testing regime in the Premier League is a complete waste of time?

 

Volpone

Well-Known Member
Am I being dim, or does this answer mean that the whole testing regime in the Premier League is a complete waste of time?

Surely, players have to be tested every single day? In the daily test figures lots have people have been tested more than once.
 

popillius

Well-Known Member
Surely, players have to be tested every single day? In the daily test figures lots have people have been tested more than once.
It doesn't matter. They could produce a negative test whilst still being infected and capable of transmission.
 

Volpone

Well-Known Member
An unnamed Bournemouth player is one of two new coronavirus cases discovered by the latest round of Premier League tests - taking the overall total of positive results to eight.
 
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Premier League

P Pld Pts
Liverpool 29  82
Manchester City 28  57
Leicester 29  53
Chelsea 29  48
Manchester Utd 29  45
Wolves 29  43
Sheffield Utd 28  43
Tottenham  29  41
Arsenal 28  40
10 Burnley 29  39
11 Palace 29  39
12 Everton 29  37
13 Newcastle Utd 29  35
14 Southampton 29  34
15 Brighton 29  29
16 West Ham Utd 29  27
17 Watford 29  27
18 Bournemouth 29  27
19 Aston Villa 28  25
20 Norwich City 29  21
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